Ientsitewate’nikonhraié:ra’te Tsi Nonkwá:ti Ne Á:se Tahatikonhsontóntie We Will Turn Our Minds There Once Again, To the Faces Yet To Come

Ientsitewate’nikonhraié:ra’te Tsi Nonkwá:ti Ne Á:se Tahatikonhsontóntie

We Will Turn Our Minds There Once Again, To the Faces Yet To Come

Second Language Speakers and Language Revitalization in Kahnawà:ke

Kahtehrón:ni Iris Stacey, 2016

Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Masters of Education, University of Victoria

Abstract

Dr. Peter Jacobs,
Department of Linguistics Co-Supervisor

Dr. Alexandra D’Arcy,
Department of Linguistics Co-Supervisor

Dr. Trish Rosborough,
Department of Curriculum and Instruction Committee Member

This research has given voice to adult second-language speakers in Kahnawà:ke to help in identifying how they can be supported to continue on their language-learning journey to insure highly accurate unabridged language will be passed on to the next generations. Recognizing these adult second-language speakers as a high priority demographic is essential and timely, as many graduates of adult immersion combined with the first generations from elementary immersion now need the most support and motivation to raise their young families in the language. After years of hard work, patience and dedication, Kanien’kéha revitalization in Kahnawà:ke seems to be at a threshold: it seems as though the next steps in language revitalization will be pivotal. The research suggests the future entails taking a kincentric approach to community language planning and serves as the first study on the impact, successes and challenges of second language speakers in Kahnawà:ke.

KahtehronniIrisStaceyMEdThesisUVic2016

Ax toowú át wudikeen, my spirit soars: Tlingit direct acquisition and co-learning pilot project

Ax toowú át wudikeen, my spirit soars: Tlingit direct acquisition and co-learning pilot project

Johnson, Sʔímlaʔxw Michele K.

Johnson, Sʔímlaʔxw Michele K. 2016. Ax toowú át wudikeen, my spirit soars: Tlingit direct acquisition and co-learning pilot project. Language Documentation & Conservation 10. 306–336.

http://hdl.handle.net/10125/24695

Many Indigenous languages, including Tlingit, are critically endangered and in urgent need of new adult speakers within the parent-aged generation. However, no consensus exists on language revitalization strategy, curricular design, lesson plans, assessment, or teaching methods. A small Tlingit cohort courageously developed and piloted a new curriculum and acquisition method by following a proven curricular design borrowed from an Interior Salish language, Nsyilxcn. This article introduces broad concepts such as the motivations behind language revitalization and quality immersion strategies for creating proficient speakers. It further describes recording techniques, the creation of sequenced curriculum designed for learners to raise each other up while teaching, and training learners to teach. It also presents a story of Tlingit language activism blended with Syilx language activism, specifically the direct acquisition method and its successful application by an adult cohort of beginner Tlingit learners.

Ax toowu at wudikeen, my spirit soars.