Deepening knowledge: Resources For And About Aboriginal Education

University of Toronto/ Ontario Institute for Studies in Education

Deepening knowledge: Resources For And About Aboriginal Education

This site allows educators to find resources to infuse Aboriginal content and perspectives into teaching. It has a list of all of the Indigenous languages that are present in Canada, which will allow teachers to find resources for that particular language.

http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/deepeningknowledge/Teacher_Resources/Curriculum_Resources_%28by_subjects%29/Indigenous_Native_Languages.html

Saulteaux language audio dictionary; Anishinabe History

Saulteaux language audio dictionary; Anishinabe History

http://www.anishinabe-history.com/language/saulteaux.shtml

This dialect of Ojibway is also known as Western Ojibway. It’s spoken from Ontario to British Columbia. Few people actually speak this Saulteaux dialect of Ojibway on a daily basis yet many have much knowledge of this Ojibway dialect. Below is an Ojibway Language audio dictionary. You’ll notice great differences. If you’ve tried learning how to speak Ojibway, you then know you can’t. Carefully study this audio dictionary because there is a good chance you’ll learn how to correctly speak Ojibway.

There are several categories of Ojibway words. However, we will focus on only three. They are words that represent objects made by humans. Objects like baskets, cups, dishes and lakes. Za-ga-i-gan is not an Ojibway correct word for lake. Zagaigan means artificial lake or as whites name them, Reservoirs. Ojibway People frequently diverted waterways to create Reservoirs in order to grow wild rice, especially in Florida where wild rice grew abundantly. Correct Ojibway word for lake is gami. Large lake is ga-mi-chi and small lake ga-miiz. Oceans and seas, it’s git-chi ga-mi which means great lake. Ojibway words pertaining to human made objects, almost always end with the letter “n” and quite frequently end with “i-gan.” Most frequent words in Ojibway deal with ordinary words like allow, approve, include, let and so on. They almost always end with “win.” Nature words including animals, is the third most prevalent category of Ojibway words. Pay careful attention to those Ojibway words to memorize Ojibway words which indicate objects made by humans and regular Ojibway words. Ojibway animal words which end with “gan” or something similar to “gan,” represent animals domesticated by humans which means they are categorized as made by humans. An example is “ma-i-gan.” That should tell you it means dog and not wolf. So “ma-ig” may actually be correct word for wolf in Ojibway. Another example is “aa-wes-si” which means animal in Ojibway. It’s obviously correct. If it was “aa-wes-si-gan” it would not be correct. Of course, “aa-wes-si-gan” means domesticated animal in Ojibway. You’ll quickly realize how whites have corrupted this language. After long research, i now understand how they corrupted this language. Old Ojibway dictionaries provided evidence or clues, to help in our cause to preserve this language. On each right of Ojibway words, i included where those words came from. Then followed procedure and created a plural, past tense and present tense from those words.

Gikinoo’amaagowin Anishinaabeg (Teaching the Anishinaabe People)

Gikinoo’amaagowin Anishinaabeg (Teaching the Anishinaabe People)

Ogimaa Ginewikwe

Colleen Sheryl McIvor

A thesis submitted to the Faculty of Indigenous Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Arts Degree
Department of Indigenous Studies
The University of Winnipeg
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada November 2013

Abstract

This thesis analyzes the roles and responsibilities of Anishinaabe Ogichidaakwe (woman warrior) using Anishinaabe and Western methodologies. As an Anishinaabekwe I use Anishinaabe language to engage in my responsibility to learn and share the language. In this thesis I move in and out of two different ways of knowing adapting to two epistemologies. While moving between Anishinaabe and Western epistemologies I located an ethical space where my spiritually connected and culturally grounded perspective is recognized. I examine and reconstruct the political/leadership, social, and spiritual roles and responsibilities of Ogichidaakwe over a critical period of change, 1632 to 1871. Anishinaabe leadership knowledge and practice experienced a shift as the Anishinaabeg community adapted to the experience of European contact. This shift is recognized after braiding together literature that is outlined in my thesis as the shift, colonial impact and absence. Of particular interest are women-based Aadizookaanag (Anishinaabe narrative with a scared being or spirit in it) and women-based Aadizookaanan (Anishinaabe narratives and ancient stories), and how these narratives are connected to Ogichidaakweg roles and responsibilities. I interconnect the Jiisikaan (shake tent), ethnohistorical, and historical as methodological approaches in my research in search of Debwewin (truth). Therefore, both the content and methodology of this thesis adds to the body of knowledge to the field of Indigenous Studies.

Keywords
Anishinaabe, methodology, Anishinaabe-izhichigewin, Ethical Space, Women’s Roles, Ogichidaakwe, Jiisikaan, Shake Tent, Ojibway, Anishinaabemowin, Anishinaabe language, Indigenous