Coyote is not a metaphor: On decolonizing, (re)claiming and (re)naming Coyote

Coyote is not a metaphor: On decolonizing, (re)claiming and (re)naming Coyote

Cutcha Risling Baldy
University of California, Davis

Abstract

This article examines Indigenous oral traditions as methodologies for decolonization by extending Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang’s (2012) settler moves to innocence to include “colonial parallelism.” This article also looks at how western attempts at colonial parallelism have resulted in Coyote First Person being compared to and identified with “trickster” characters and argues that drawing this colonial parallelism of Coyote First Person as part of a universal trickster archetype renders Coyote First Person as a metaphor and erases how Coyote First Person actually builds and supports Indigenous ideas about the world and unsettles western ideas about the world. Ultimately this article asks readers to consider that, as we engage with Coyote First Person as a philosopher and philosophy of decolonization discourse, we should consider how the (re)naming of Coyote, rather than Coyote First Person or the given Indigenous language name, speaks to our theoretical standpoint.

Keywords:

oral history; decolonization; literature; Coyote; trickster; revitalization

Baldy-C-R_2015_Coyote is not a metaphor-On decolonizing reclaiming and renaming Coyote

Indigenous Principles Decolonizing Teacher Education: What We Have Learned

Indigenous Principles Decolonizing Teacher Education: What We Have Learned

Kathy Sanford, Lorna Williams, Tim Hopper, and Catherine McGregor

University of Victoria

Abstract

Although teacher education programs across the country are currently under significant review and reform, little attention is paid to the importance of Indigenous principles that could inform or transform them. Attention to Indigenous principles such as those presented in this paper can, we believe, serve to decolonize teacher education, offering programs that enable greater success for a wider array of diverse students, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, and address their needs and interests. The intent of this paper is to draw attention to the ways Indigenous principles offered by Lil’wat scholar Lorna Williams have influenced one teacher education program, and to share some of the ways that these principles have been enacted within the program. We offer our perspectives as narrative accounts of what we have done in our courses and in our teacher education program that reflect the principles explained in the paper. We do not feel we can express this perspective any different other than to recount shifts made and our observations as educators. These could be expressed as case studies but this would only be paying lip service to claiming a methodology that was not really followed. We offer this paper more as a sharing of narratives drawn to the indigenous principles. Authenticity comes from our common perceptions from different perspectives in the program.

Keywords: Indigenous Knowledge; Teacher Education; Decolonization

Indigenous Principles Decolonizing Teacher Education: What We Have Learned