Tansi! Nehiyawetan

Tansi! Nehiyawetan

http://tansi.tv/

This site invites children to learn Cree with Kai, Kayla and Auntie Josephine through kinetic games, absorbing stories, compelling songs and dynamic adventures. Join Kai and Kayla as they find out about Cree culture and language while they go on learning adventures in the city of Vancouver. Nehiyawetan incorporates words that reflect what kids are interested in like space, art, sports, powwows, music, animals, Christmas and scary stuff. On their adventure, they meet accomplished Aboriginal people like John Herrington, who is the first Aboriginal astronaut to walk in space, actress Tantoo Cardinal, Olympic design artist and Musqueam weaver Debra Sparrow. Using music to help teach Cree, Tansi! Nehiyawetan showcases award winning Aboriginal music guests including Art Napolean, Cheryl L’Hirondelle and Jason Burnstick, who share sing along Cree songs.

Ientsitewate’nikonhraié:ra’te Tsi Nonkwá:ti Ne Á:se Tahatikonhsontóntie We Will Turn Our Minds There Once Again, To the Faces Yet To Come

Ientsitewate’nikonhraié:ra’te Tsi Nonkwá:ti Ne Á:se Tahatikonhsontóntie

We Will Turn Our Minds There Once Again, To the Faces Yet To Come

Second Language Speakers and Language Revitalization in Kahnawà:ke

Kahtehrón:ni Iris Stacey, 2016

Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Masters of Education, University of Victoria

Abstract

Dr. Peter Jacobs,
Department of Linguistics Co-Supervisor

Dr. Alexandra D’Arcy,
Department of Linguistics Co-Supervisor

Dr. Trish Rosborough,
Department of Curriculum and Instruction Committee Member

This research has given voice to adult second-language speakers in Kahnawà:ke to help in identifying how they can be supported to continue on their language-learning journey to insure highly accurate unabridged language will be passed on to the next generations. Recognizing these adult second-language speakers as a high priority demographic is essential and timely, as many graduates of adult immersion combined with the first generations from elementary immersion now need the most support and motivation to raise their young families in the language. After years of hard work, patience and dedication, Kanien’kéha revitalization in Kahnawà:ke seems to be at a threshold: it seems as though the next steps in language revitalization will be pivotal. The research suggests the future entails taking a kincentric approach to community language planning and serves as the first study on the impact, successes and challenges of second language speakers in Kahnawà:ke.

KahtehronniIrisStaceyMEdThesisUVic2016

Creepy White Gaze: Rethinking the Diorama as a Pedagogical Activity

Creepy White Gaze: Rethinking the Diorama as a Pedagogical Activity

Sterzuk, A., & Mulholland, V. (June 06, 2011). Creepy White Gaze: Rethinking the Diorama as a Pedagogical Activity. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 57, 1, 16-27.

In this paper, Sterzuk and Mulholland use gaze theory and postcolonial theory to deconstruct a problematic photograph appearing in a Saskatchewan teachers’ newsletter. The photograph depicted a historically and culturally inaccurate diorama of “Great Plains Indians” made by a white settler student and entered in a local heritage fair. The authors want to trouble seemingly banal, everyday educational practices, such as diorama building, that reinforce hierarchies of race. They also show that such practices have been occurring for decades and have not changed much, thus challenging the self-congratulatory ethos of many schools that simply including ‘aboriginal content’ is enough.

In this paper, Sterzuk and Mulholland use gaze theory and postcolonial theory to deconstruct a problematic photograph appearing in a Saskatchewan teachers’ newsletter. The photograph depicted a historically and culturally inaccurate diorama of “Great Plains Indians” made by a white settler student and entered in a local heritage fair. The authors want to trouble seemingly banal, everyday educational practices, such as diorama building, that reinforce hierarchies of race. They also show that such practices have been occurring for decades and have not changed much, thus challenging the self-congratulatory ethos of many schools that simply including ‘aboriginal content’ is enough.The authors explore gaze theory in Foucauldian (gaze as a means of control) and Lacanian (gaze as a means of identification between viewer and object) senses. They argue that white settlers gazing or looking at both the diorama and the photograph of the diorama reinforces the settler subject’s feeling that they are entitled to construct and objectify the other.

The authors explore gaze theory in Foucauldian (gaze as a means of control) and Lacanian (gaze as a means of identification between viewer and object) senses. They argue that white settlers gazing or looking at both the diorama and the photograph of the diorama reinforces the settler subject’s feeling that they are entitled to construct and objectify the other.They then call on Willinsky’s theorizing of how “the world was made an object of the gaze through European imperialism” (p. 20). Sterzuk and Mulholland argue that in the diorama, like in the museum, “the powerful are free to display their stolen loot flagrantly and claim that the practice is an educational enterprise” (p. 21).

They then call on Willinsky’s theorizing of how “the world was made an object of the gaze through European imperialism” (p. 20). Sterzuk and Mulholland argue that in the diorama, like in the museum, “the powerful are free to display their stolen loot flagrantly and claim that the practice is an educational enterprise” (p. 21).They conclude that “the diorama (and the gaze it invites as evidenced by the image in question) is less about the study of “The Plains Indians” and more about the construction of racialized identities and dominance as well as the colonial pleasure afforded by the publication of this photograph in the provincial teachers’ newsletter” (p. 25). They call for faculties of education (and Canadian society at large) to become more aware of the relations between colonizer and colonized

They conclude that “the diorama (and the gaze it invites as evidenced by the image in question) is less about the study of “The Plains Indians” and more about the construction of racialized identities and dominance as well as the colonial pleasure afforded by the publication of this photograph in the provincial teachers’ newsletter” (p. 25). They call for faculties of education (and Canadian society at large) to become more aware of the relations between colonizer and colonized that produce situations where settlers can uncritically construct Indigenous peoples.Sterzuk and Mulholland provide a valuable critique of multicultural educational practices. As I study how settler teachers can include Indigenous ways,

Sterzuk and Mulholland provide a valuable critique of multicultural educational practices. As I study how settler teachers can include Indigenous ways, knowledges, languages and histories in the curriculum, it is useful to think about how these knowledges can be included in respectful and accurate ways. There is always a danger that marginalized voices, when included as ‘add-ons’ to the ‘mainstream’ curriculum, will be co-opted to reinforce — rather than challenge — the status-quo. For example, to reinforce white settler identities as exceptional. This article challenges us to think carefully about how and why we design lessons, activities and curriculum, and what it means to decolonize and/or indigenize schools and other institutions.Questions: What are best practices for teaching about Indigenous histories in settler schools?

Question:

What are best practices for teaching about Indigenous histories in settler schools?