University of Alberta: Indigenous Languages Education

University of Alberta: Indigenous Languages Education

We are an educational study program providing courses in language education to Indigenous language instructors, teachers, and First Nation communities. We recognize the need for a program that includes languages, language education curriculum and materials, pedagogy, assessment, school-based language policy and planning, research and technological advances in teaching, curriculum, and research. The inclusion of Elders and Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS) are essential to our program.

http://ile.ualberta.ca/

University of Ottawa: Site for Language Management in Canada

University of Ottawa: Site for Language Management in Canada

The first part of this site is focussed on the geographical situation for Canada’s geographical, legal, administrative, and demographic entity.

The second part is devoted to the history of language in Canada, focussing on the first language spoken from Indigenous people to the introduction to English and French.

The third part focusses on the languages that are still present in Canada.

The fourth is devoted to language legislation in Canada.

The fifth section describes the existing language organizations and services in Canada.

The sixth section compares the Canadian model to bilingualism in other countries.

And the final section the international organizations for language rights.

https://slmc.uottawa.ca/?q=native_peoples_languages

Six Nations Polytechnic

Six Nations Polytechnic

Six Nations Polytechnic is a unique postsecondary organization, recognized by community, government, and institutions of higher learning, as a Centre of Excellence for Indigenous Knowledge. Established in Canada’s most populous First Nation there is no other place where you can invest your time to acquire skills that lead to employment as well as learn about the history, culture and philosophy of Indigenous peoples of the region. Choose Six Nations Polytechnic to study alongside others who believe in Ga’nigohi:yo:/Kanikoriio (Respect and the Good Mind) values and learn together to build a positive future.

http://www.snpolytechnic.com

Anishinaabe Mino-Blmaadiziwin (The Way of a GoodMe)

Anishinaabe Mino-Blmaadiziwin
(The Way of a GoodMe)

A thesis submitted to the Committee on Graduate Studies in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts in the Faculty of Arts and Science at Trent University, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada, 1998.

Abstract

Anishinaabe Mino-Binaudiziwin (The Way of a Good Me)
D’Amy Ishpeming’enzaabid Rheault

This thesis is an examination of Anishinaabe philosophy, particularly Mino-Birnaadiziwin (The Way of a Good Life) as it is explained by the traditional Teachings of the Anishinaabeg. To this end, Primary Experiential Knowledge is used as the method of investigation.

This thesis explains the meaning, purpose, and function of Anishinaabe Primary Experiential Knowledge as a method of philosophical exploration based on Applied Anishinaabe Theory: traditional principles of verification based on a personal interaction with traditional Anishinaabe Teachers and Elders.

Since research and learning for an Anishinaabe person includes more than an investigation of the external world – it is also a personal spiritual journey of knowledge gathering and self-discovery, I use a Primary Experiential Knowledge method to discuss the general philosophy that can be distilled or extracted from the traditional oral Teachings without reproducing those oral Teachings in written form.

mino bumaadiziwin

Creepy White Gaze: Rethinking the Diorama as a Pedagogical Activity

Creepy White Gaze: Rethinking the Diorama as a Pedagogical Activity

Sterzuk, A., & Mulholland, V. (June 06, 2011). Creepy White Gaze: Rethinking the Diorama as a Pedagogical Activity. Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 57, 1, 16-27.

In this paper, Sterzuk and Mulholland use gaze theory and postcolonial theory to deconstruct a problematic photograph appearing in a Saskatchewan teachers’ newsletter. The photograph depicted a historically and culturally inaccurate diorama of “Great Plains Indians” made by a white settler student and entered in a local heritage fair. The authors want to trouble seemingly banal, everyday educational practices, such as diorama building, that reinforce hierarchies of race. They also show that such practices have been occurring for decades and have not changed much, thus challenging the self-congratulatory ethos of many schools that simply including ‘aboriginal content’ is enough.

In this paper, Sterzuk and Mulholland use gaze theory and postcolonial theory to deconstruct a problematic photograph appearing in a Saskatchewan teachers’ newsletter. The photograph depicted a historically and culturally inaccurate diorama of “Great Plains Indians” made by a white settler student and entered in a local heritage fair. The authors want to trouble seemingly banal, everyday educational practices, such as diorama building, that reinforce hierarchies of race. They also show that such practices have been occurring for decades and have not changed much, thus challenging the self-congratulatory ethos of many schools that simply including ‘aboriginal content’ is enough.The authors explore gaze theory in Foucauldian (gaze as a means of control) and Lacanian (gaze as a means of identification between viewer and object) senses. They argue that white settlers gazing or looking at both the diorama and the photograph of the diorama reinforces the settler subject’s feeling that they are entitled to construct and objectify the other.

The authors explore gaze theory in Foucauldian (gaze as a means of control) and Lacanian (gaze as a means of identification between viewer and object) senses. They argue that white settlers gazing or looking at both the diorama and the photograph of the diorama reinforces the settler subject’s feeling that they are entitled to construct and objectify the other.They then call on Willinsky’s theorizing of how “the world was made an object of the gaze through European imperialism” (p. 20). Sterzuk and Mulholland argue that in the diorama, like in the museum, “the powerful are free to display their stolen loot flagrantly and claim that the practice is an educational enterprise” (p. 21).

They then call on Willinsky’s theorizing of how “the world was made an object of the gaze through European imperialism” (p. 20). Sterzuk and Mulholland argue that in the diorama, like in the museum, “the powerful are free to display their stolen loot flagrantly and claim that the practice is an educational enterprise” (p. 21).They conclude that “the diorama (and the gaze it invites as evidenced by the image in question) is less about the study of “The Plains Indians” and more about the construction of racialized identities and dominance as well as the colonial pleasure afforded by the publication of this photograph in the provincial teachers’ newsletter” (p. 25). They call for faculties of education (and Canadian society at large) to become more aware of the relations between colonizer and colonized

They conclude that “the diorama (and the gaze it invites as evidenced by the image in question) is less about the study of “The Plains Indians” and more about the construction of racialized identities and dominance as well as the colonial pleasure afforded by the publication of this photograph in the provincial teachers’ newsletter” (p. 25). They call for faculties of education (and Canadian society at large) to become more aware of the relations between colonizer and colonized that produce situations where settlers can uncritically construct Indigenous peoples.Sterzuk and Mulholland provide a valuable critique of multicultural educational practices. As I study how settler teachers can include Indigenous ways,

Sterzuk and Mulholland provide a valuable critique of multicultural educational practices. As I study how settler teachers can include Indigenous ways, knowledges, languages and histories in the curriculum, it is useful to think about how these knowledges can be included in respectful and accurate ways. There is always a danger that marginalized voices, when included as ‘add-ons’ to the ‘mainstream’ curriculum, will be co-opted to reinforce — rather than challenge — the status-quo. For example, to reinforce white settler identities as exceptional. This article challenges us to think carefully about how and why we design lessons, activities and curriculum, and what it means to decolonize and/or indigenize schools and other institutions.Questions: What are best practices for teaching about Indigenous histories in settler schools?

Question:

What are best practices for teaching about Indigenous histories in settler schools?

An Indigenous Feminist’s Take on the Ontological Turn: ‘Ontology’ Is Just Another Word For Colonialism

An Indigenous Feminist’s Take on the Ontological Turn: ‘Ontology’ Is Just Another Word For Colonialism

Todd, Z. (2016) An Indigenous Feminist’s Take on the Ontological Turn: ‘Ontology’ Is Just Another Word For Colonialism. Journal of Historical Sociology, 29: 4–22. doi: 10.1111/johs.12124.

THEME:

Ethical Relationality – avoiding “re-colonization” when working with Indigenous knowledges and some practical tips for decolonizing scholarship.

In this article, Todd takes on a recent trend in anthropology, the “Ontological Turn”. I am not 100% certain, but it seems that the Ontological Turn is a willingness in the field of anthropology to examine (critique) Western ontologies and knowledge production strategies in contrast to other non-Western worldviews. It seems that the Ontological Turn in anthropology is being mirrored in Education, in the way that Indigenous ways of knowing are starting to be incorporated in curriculum, teaching and research methods. Todd’s critique is important because it calls attention to the ways in which the Western academy may co-opt Indigenous thinking, stripping it of its true intentions to make it fit pre-existing structures.

Todd points to a trend in anthropology of white scholars citing other white scholars on topics related to multiple ontological realities — Indigenous worldviews and knowledges, rather than citing Indigenous thinkers and scholars who have written or spoken about the same themes. The need to ‘filter’ Indigenous voices through white voices is problematic because it situates Indigenous thinkers as objects or collaborators rather than philosophers, theorizers and intellectuals ‘in their own right’. This in turn makes a statement about whose knowledge is truly valued in the academy; that is, white speakers are valued over Indigenous speakers.
Throughout the piece, Todd advances ideas for helping scholars remain accountable to the people and places that they draw knowledge from. This quotation sums up her tips quite well:

◦ “Sundberg and Watts both provide Euro-Western scholars with practical tools for employing Indigenous ontologies in their work with care and respect: account for location (Sundberg 2014) and Indigenous Place-Thought (Watts 2013:31) – and consider the ongoing colonial imperatives of the academy” (Todd, 2016, p. 9).

Other tips include:

◦ Consider the concept of ‘ethical relationality’ (Dwayne Donald 2009): Living up to our duties to humans, animals, land, water, climate, etc.
◦ Consider our own prejudices: certain voices are privileged while others are silenced
◦ Consider digging for POC, women and others left out of academic discourses who are discussing topics in other ways – rather than citing a “Great Thinker” (often male and white)
◦ Broaden the spectrum of who is reaffirmed as ‘knowledgeable’: Familiarise yourself with the work of  Indigenous thinkers

Aboriginal Ways of Knowing: Aboriginal-led Evaluation / Modes de connaissance autochtones: l’évaluation menée par des Autochtones

Aboriginal Ways of Knowing: Aboriginal-led Evaluation / Modes de connaissance autochtones: l’évaluation menée par des Autochtones

Guest Editor’s Introduction / Introduction de la rédactrice invitée

Andrea L.K. Johnston

The Canadian Journal of Program Evaluation Vol. 23 No. 1 Pages 1–6ISSN 0834-1516 Copyright © 2010 Canadian Evaluation Society

Aboriginal-Ways-of-Knowing-Aboriginal-led-Evaluation

A Way Forward for Indigenous languages

A Way Forward for Indigenous languages

Abstract

Should Aboriginal students be taught in their own languages? Nola Purdie considers strategies for strengthening the quality of Indigenous languages programs in schools.

Recommended Citation

Purdie, Nola (2009) “A Way Forward For Indigenous Languages,” : No. 21 , Article 2. Available at: https://research.acer.edu.au/resdev/vol21/iss21/2